This is information as provided by the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA)

 
 
 

When can I apply for a state cannabis cultivation license?

Applications will be available for all California state cannabis cultivation licenses—both
medicinal and adult-use (recreational)—on January 1, 2018.

How are you developing the cannabis cultivation licensing
regulations?

The California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) is required to follow the
statutory requirements found in the California Administrative Procedure Act. CDFA
works with stakeholders, the public, and licensing authorities to develop the standards
and regulations necessary to successfully implement a statewide cannabis cultivation
regulatory structure in California.
CDFA intends to use the emergency rulemaking process in 2017 for developing the
state’s combined medicinal and adult-use cannabis cultivation licensing regulations.
For a detailed description of this process, visit the California Office of Administrative
Law (OAL) at oal.ca.gov; click on the “Rulemaking Process” link.

How do I apply for a cannabis cultivation license?

The California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) is not issuing any
cultivation licenses until January 1, 2018. However, in preparation for state
licensure, CDFA recommends staying up to date on city and/or county government
requirements for local cannabis cultivation licenses and permits.

How can I receive updates on the status of California’s cultivation licensing regulations?

The California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) regularly posts information
on its CalCannabis Cultivation Licensing website and via these three social media
channels: Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Email alerts are another way to get
information. For links to these resources, please go to: calcannabis.cdfa.ca.gov

What is the Medicinal and Adult-Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MAUCRSA)?

On June 27, 2017, California Governor Jerry Brown signed the cannabis trailer bill (also known as California Senate Bill 94), which effectively merged two existing bills—the Medical Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MCRSA) and the Adult Use of Marijuana Act (AUMA)—into one streamlined bill: the Medicinal and Adult-Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MAUCRSA). Having one comprehensive state law will provide for a more unified regulatory process governing both medicinal and adult-use cannabis. You can read the full text of MAUCRSA on the CalCannabis Cultivation
Licensing website at: calcannabis.cdfa.ca.gov

How long will a license last before it must be renewed?

All commercial cannabis cultivation licenses will be valid for one year; a license must
be renewed to continue commercial cannabis cultivation.

What is the cannabis track-and-trace system? How will it work?

The California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) is developing a trackand-
trace system for both medicinal and adult-use (recreational) cannabis that all
commercial cannabis licensees in California will be required to use. This system
will record the movement of cannabis and cannabis products through the supply
chain—from cultivation to sale—which will help ensure that if a public safety concern
arises, the source will be identifiable. The track-and-trace system also will help prevent
black-market cannabis products from entering the regulated market, and likewise
help prevent regulated cannabis products from being diverted into the black market.
In June 2017, CDFA selected Franwell Inc. as the state’s cannabis track-and-trace
vendor.

Will there be different rules for how medicinal and adult-use
(recreational) cannabis may be grown in California?

The California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) is still developing
regulations, but the cultivation requirements are expected to be the same for growing
medicinal and adult-use cannabis. However, cannabis products sold to the public
must be clearly differentiated as either medicinal or adult-use (recreational) products.

Is cannabis considered an agricultural crop in California?

California defines medicinal and adult-use (recreational) cannabis as an agricultural
product. However, this identification as an agricultural product is limited to the
Medicinal and Adult-Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MAUCRSA).

What types of cannabis cultivation licenses will be offered
in California?

The California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) will issue
17 types of cannabis cultivation licenses:

  1. Specialty Cottage Outdoor: Outdoor cultivation site with up to 25 mature plants

  2. Specialty Cottage Indoor: Indoor cultivation with up to 500 square feet or less of total canopy

  3. Specialty Cottage Mixed-Light: A mixed-light cultivation site with 2,500 square
    feet or less of total canopy

  4. Specialty Outdoor: An outdoor cultivation site with 5,000 square
    feet or less of total canopy—or up to 50 mature plants on noncontiguous plots

  5. Specialty Indoor: An indoor cultivation site of between 501 and
    5,000 square feet of total canopy

  6. Specialty Mixed-Light: A mixed-light cultivation site of between 2,501
    and 5,000 square feet of total canopy

  7. Small Outdoor: An outdoor cultivation site of between 5,001
    and 10,000 square feet of total canopy

  8. Small Indoor: An indoor cultivation site of between 5,001
    and 10,000 square feet of total canopy

  9. Small Mixed-Light: A mixed-light cultivation site of between 5,001
    and 10,000 square feet of total canopy

  10. Medium Outdoor: An outdoor cultivation site of between 10,001
    square feet and 1 acre of total canopy

  11. Medium Indoor: An indoor cultivation site of between 10,001 and
    22,000 square feet of total canopy

  12. Medium Mixed-Light: A mixed-light cultivation site of between 10,001
    and 22,000 square feet of total canopy

  13. Nursery: Cultivation of cannabis solely as a nursery
    (examples of typical nursery activities include
    cloning and seed propagation)

  14. Processor: A cultivation site that conducts only trimming,
    drying, curing, grading, or packaging of cannabis
    and nonmanufactured cannabis products

  15. Large Outdoor: For outdoor cultivation that uses no artificial
    lighting for more than 1 acre of total canopy size
    on one premises
    Note: CDFA will not issue any Large Outdoor licenses
    prior to January 1, 2023

  16. Large Indoor: For indoor cultivation that exclusively uses
    artificial lighting for more than 22,000 square feet
    of total canopy size on one premises
    Note: CDFA will not issue any Large Indoor licenses
    prior to January 1, 2023

  17. Large Mixed-Light: For cultivation using a combination of natural
    and supplemental artificial lighting at a maximum
    threshold (which will be determined by the
    licensing authority) for more than 22,000 square
    feet of total canopy size on one premises
    Note: CDFA will not issue any Large Mixed-Light
    licenses prior to January 1, 2023